Category Archives: Sabre technique

So you want to fence like a pro…here’s the Korean cadet training schedule

Korean_Team_Asian_Champs_2015_mug
“Mom, I want to be like these guys!”

Every week, we get another hopeful kid sidling up to one of our instructors (sometimes accompanied by mom or dad) to shyly ask:

“How do I get really good at fencing?”

In the words of the venerable Mr. Lee Hyo Kun, head coach of the Korean Mens Sabre Team and childhood coach of world #1 Gu Bon Gil (and our very own Australian Champ Kim Dong Hwan):

“Practice. More Practice. No fun”.

But when it's all over...
But when it’s all over…

Here’s a translated summary of the typical schedule for a young Korean aspiring pro fencer:

6am: Wake up.
6am-8am: Go for a run, preferably with hills and sprints.
8am-10am: Eat breakfast and have a nap.
10am-12:00pm: Footwork and bladework drills.
12:00pm-2pm: Lunch and another nap.
2pm-5pm: More drills and bouting.
5pm-8:00pm: Dinner and another nap.
8:00pm-10pm: In off-season, weight training alternating with rest days. In competition season, more bouting.
10pm: Bed. No video games.

That’s the schedule Monday to Saturday. Apparently they get Sundays off.

Coach has high standards
Coach has high standards. And little sympathy.

In later weeks we’ll cover the finer points of what the practice entails, and what more seasoned competitors like us  with less time/youth/self-discipline can do to maximise their training outcomes.

Typical post-training nap
Typical scene at Sydney Sabre after youth (under-15) training. Not shown: older fencers relaxing in the attached cafe.
This work is made possible by the research work done by the staff and students at the Sydney Sabre Centre, so if you like this I would really appreciate you leaving a review on Facebook and Google – 5 stars would be great but even better if you tell us why!
 
We read every single review and are always looking to improve how we do things because ultimately Sydney Sabre is all about  sharing this great sport and making it accessible to everyone. I know that this sport is a big part of who I am today, and wish this place was around when I was growing up.
 
If that isn’t enough motivation for you, here’s another reason: we will give you a stackable 5% discount off on anything we sell (services and stuff) for each review that you leave for us, for one transaction. You can spend it on yourself or use it to subsidise a friend (or a whole bunch of friends, if you want to bring along a horde).
 
Thanks in advance.
 
John

This is how to hold your sabre (redux)

“How do I hold the sabre?” is one of the most common questions we get at Sydney Sabre.

and all bets are off
Classic sabre grip. Also posing.

This is the traditional way of holding a sabre:

traditional-sabre-grip
Old school.

This is the modern way to hold a sabre:

......can shut down the opposition...
So kind of these two to pose for mirror image demos.

Things have not changed much in over 100 years.

Continue reading This is how to hold your sabre (redux)

This work is made possible by the research work done by the staff and students at the Sydney Sabre Centre, so if you like this I would really appreciate you leaving a review on Facebook and Google – 5 stars would be great but even better if you tell us why!
 
We read every single review and are always looking to improve how we do things because ultimately Sydney Sabre is all about  sharing this great sport and making it accessible to everyone. I know that this sport is a big part of who I am today, and wish this place was around when I was growing up.
 
If that isn’t enough motivation for you, here’s another reason: we will give you a stackable 5% discount off on anything we sell (services and stuff) for each review that you leave for us, for one transaction. You can spend it on yourself or use it to subsidise a friend (or a whole bunch of friends, if you want to bring along a horde).
 
Thanks in advance.
 
John