Category Archives: Epic Sabre Hit

Space magic: Gu Bongil defies the laws of Nature, and also has rather good glutes.

We’re working on some new biomechanics projects at the moment. As regular readers may be aware, we’ve been interested in Gu Bongil as a beautiful example of how to move efficiently.

While we were digging around for data, we found this.


LOOK AT THIS ACTION. LOOK AT IT. LOOK AT HIS FEET.

We had a chat with visiting biomechanics expert Kevin C. Moore about what’s going on here. Surprisingly, it’s not all done with magnets.

FC: Kevin, is this incontrovertible proof that the Korean sabre program has developed an anti-gravity device?

KM: Maybe not anti-grav, but certainly a method of getting pretty epic energy return.

What blows my mind the most about this is how the gait-like behaviour in the leading foot (the natural dorsi/plantar flexion cycle) is feeding entirely off the energy transfer of the the back leg. Not even tapping the floor with that right foot means that his abdominal wall and spinal column are absorbing enough functional reaction force  to momentarily replace the acceleration of freaking gravity as the source of forward momentum.

The internal relationships are so clean, in fact, that on landing he even manages to load all his initial impact in that dominant glute, which is hard enough to do well when you run, much less when you’re fencing and can’t cross your feet.

So not so much magnets a series of coiling springs. Which, after all, is what the musculoskeletal system is.

Either that or the rumours are true, and we’ve just proved that Mr Gu is a space alien.

All in all, a pretty astonishing demonstration.

Flash – Reshetnikov (RUS) v Occhiuzzi (ITA)

Sorry for the extended absence! I’ve just come to the horrifying realization that the new season starts in 3 weeks, and I haven’t finished watching the fun stuff from last season yet.

On that note, here’s some hilarious footwork from Diego Occhiuzzi. Footwork, with one foot.

I’m almost sorry he didn’t pull that one off.

Theme of the match, though, was sparkling bladework exchanges.

Oooooh that’s pretty. And there was more of that kind of thing. Jeez, these two have fast hands.

In other news, Reshtnikov has been putting some work into his victory pose:

Full bout is here. There’s some high-grade drama from Occhiuzzi, including an impassioned appeal over a one-light hit. Superb value as always.

“Equipment works perfectly in all situations”

Disclaimer: This isn’t intended as a dig at any particular recent policy decisions by the FIE. I have always used 2-pin, as does most of my club.

I'm sorry, what?
I’m sorry, what?

But the phrasing of the announcement was hilarious, and reminded me of one of the greatest moments of the 2015 Madrid world cup.

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you: Equipment Working Perfectly in All Situations, such as 14/14 in a World Cup DE.

This got a spectacular reaction from Hyokun Lee:

After that little interlude, the last hit of the bout was also a complete debacle. The French were not impressed:

My favourite part is Gu Bongil, unable to watch, hiding his face in his hands: on the left of the Korean team, sitting against the wall. Such concern.

There’s only partial video of the bout, but what we’ve got is here. Highly amusing.

 

 

Mild trolling: Kim (KOR) v Szilagyi (HUN)

Kim v Szilagyi: If that billing doesn’t get your attention, you’re not doing sabre fandom right. The last match of the Moscow quarterfinals was the kind of lineup that forces foolish Australians like myself to stay up to 4am to watch the live stream.

Szilagyi had apparently recovered his equilibrium after his epic thrashing by Kim in New York and controlled this one pretty nicely, with a lot of elegant compound attacks. But regular readers should be aware that nice pretty Hungarian sabre is not really the sort of thing I watch for fun, so, because it’s my birthday, we’re instead going to see Junghwan Kim doing crazy things:

I get that the point of that maneuver is to draw counterattack, but in this case what it drew was more stunned incredulity. Hey, whatever works.

On an unrelated note, this is still my favourite parry:

After that, though, the ref decided he really didn’t like Kim’s attacks, and things went rapidly downhill for Team Korea. Then came the 8 point break, and with it, one of the greatest moments in sabre coaching I’ve ever seen:

Did… Did he just go up to Junghwan Kim in the 1-minute break at a Grand Prix quarterfinal, and pat him on the head like a puppy? Is this going to help? Or is it like the kiss of death in the mafia?

Shockingly enough, it didn’t help, as you can see in the full match below. Nice pretty Hungarian fencing etc etc.

Probably lucky it turned out like it did, or I would have been up until 5:30am for the final.